must stop clicking and feed the kids. must. stop.
seriously. okay--in 3...2...1...

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Historical Times with 299 notes

historicaltimes:

Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon-Tiki Expedition across the Pacific, 1947

historicaltimes:

Thor Heyerdahl’s Kon-Tiki Expedition across the Pacific, 1947

Tagged: marinerhistory

18th July 2014

Video reblogged from Laughing Squid with 78 notes

laughingsquid:

‘The History of Hollywood in Under 10 Minutes’, A Video Crash Course in Cinema From 65 A.D. to the Present

Tagged: moviesfilmhistoryhelpyhelperton

17th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Nothing to See / Hear with 31 notes

Tagged: aeromilitaryhistory

Source: enginedynamicsinc

15th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Bassmen with 5 notes

bassman5911:

S. P. Graves, instrument man, working on new construction bridge at Norris Dam, October 1933 by The U.S. National Archives on Flickr.

bassman5911:

S. P. Graves, instrument man, working on new construction bridge at Norris Dam, October 1933 by The U.S. National Archives on Flickr.

Tagged: portraitshistory

14th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Naval Architecture with 44 notes

rarething:

Venice, 1925

<3

rarething:

Venice, 1925

<3

Tagged: marinerVeniceItalyhistory

Source: rarething

13th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Arms and Armor with 124 notes

paxtonfearless:

Knight -Go Hard Or Go Home by AndersStangl

paxtonfearless:

Knight -Go Hard Or Go Home by AndersStangl

Tagged: armormilitaryhistoryarms

Source: deviantart.com

8th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Scientific Illustration with 657 notes

rhamphotheca:

How Birds Survived the Dinosaur Apocalypse
by Michael Balter
When nearly every dinosaur went extinct 66 million years ago, the only ones that survived were those that had shrunk—that is, the birds. Today, there are 10,000 species of these feathered fliers, making them the most diverse of all the four-limbed animals. A new study reveals why this lineage has been so successful: Birds started downsizing well before the rest of the dinosaurs disappeared.
“This is a very impressive piece of work and by far the most comprehensive analysis of dinosaur body size that has been conducted,” says Stephen Brusatte, a paleontologist at the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom, who was not involved in the research. “The study shows that birds didn’t just become small suddenly, but were the end product of a long-term trend of body size decline that took many tens of millions of years.”
Dinosaurs were small in the beginning. About 230 million years ago, most weighed between 10 and 35 kg and were as big as a medium-sized dog. But many species soon soared to tractor-trailer proportions, reaching 10,000 kg within 30 million years. Later on, dinosaurs like the mighty Argentinosaurus, which stretched some 35 meters from nose to tail, weighed in at a staggering 90,000 kg…
(read more: Science News/AAAS)
illustration courtesy of Julius Csotonyi

rhamphotheca:

How Birds Survived the Dinosaur Apocalypse

by Michael Balter

When nearly every dinosaur went extinct 66 million years ago, the only ones that survived were those that had shrunk—that is, the birds. Today, there are 10,000 species of these feathered fliers, making them the most diverse of all the four-limbed animals. A new study reveals why this lineage has been so successful: Birds started downsizing well before the rest of the dinosaurs disappeared.

“This is a very impressive piece of work and by far the most comprehensive analysis of dinosaur body size that has been conducted,” says Stephen Brusatte, a paleontologist at the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom, who was not involved in the research. “The study shows that birds didn’t just become small suddenly, but were the end product of a long-term trend of body size decline that took many tens of millions of years.”

Dinosaurs were small in the beginning. About 230 million years ago, most weighed between 10 and 35 kg and were as big as a medium-sized dog. But many species soon soared to tractor-trailer proportions, reaching 10,000 kg within 30 million years. Later on, dinosaurs like the mighty Argentinosaurus, which stretched some 35 meters from nose to tail, weighed in at a staggering 90,000 kg…

(read more: Science News/AAAS)

illustration courtesy of Julius Csotonyi

Tagged: sciencehistory

Source: rhamphotheca

4th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Ne Obliviscaris with 458 notes

heckyesamericana:

ca. 1867-76, [37 star American national flag, medallion pattern]
via Jeff Bridgman Antiques and American Flags

heckyesamericana:

ca. 1867-76, [37 star American national flag, medallion pattern]

via Jeff Bridgman Antiques and American Flags

Tagged: 4thhistory

Source: heckyesamericana