must stop clicking and feed the kids. must. stop.
seriously. okay--in 3...2...1...

17th April 2014

Post reblogged from Exploring Space with 14 notes

Laying the groundwork for Gagarin: The USSR’s space research pioneers

spaceexp:


How the preparation work for the first manned space flight was conducted
Full article

Tagged: spacehistorytechnology

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from MOSKOVIA ♔ ~ with 48,994 notes

georginakincaid:

The word sword comes from the Old English sweord, cognate to swert"to wound, to cut"

The sword is symbolic of liberty and strength. In the Middle Ages, the sword was often used as a symbol of the word of God. The names given to many swords in mythologyliterature, and history reflect the high prestige of the weapon and the wealth of the owner.

Tagged: weaponshistoryswordsart

Source: georginakincaid

8th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Gifts Of Life with 90 notes

massarrah:

List of Mesopotamian Gods and Goddesses

This fragment from the Library of Ashurbanipal contains part of an explanatory list of the names of gods written in Akkadian cuneiform of the Neo-Assyrian period. For some of the entries, the scribe has added a pronunciation gloss to show how to read a particular name or epithet. Most of the lines in the first and third columns of the obverse (first photo) begin with the sign that represents the divine determinative to indicate that the name that follows is that of a god. (Source)

Nineveh, 7th century BCE.

British Museum.

Tagged: historywritingreligion

Source: massarrah

6th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Hang Out On Clouds with 281 notes


historiated:
Nitium page of the Book of Durrow, mid-late 7th century Hiberno-Saxon manuscript.

historiated:

Nitium page of the Book of Durrow, mid-late 7th century Hiberno-Saxon manuscript.

Tagged: writingarthistory

Source: historiated

3rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from Exploring Space with 33 notes

spaceexp:

"Miss NASA" 1968 Winner

spaceexp:

"Miss NASA" 1968 Winner

Tagged: spacesciencehistoryportraits

3rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from Exploring Space with 642 notes

destroyed-and-abandoned:

The Soviet Moon Lander built to beat the Americans to the moon. Found abandoned in a Lab in Moscow…
ethan_kahn:


album
Soviet scientists were well ahead of their American counterparts in moon exploration before President John F. Kennedy pronounced the U.S. would put a man there first. The Soviets had already landed the probe Luna 2 on the surface of the moon in 1959 and had an orbiting satellite in 1966.
The Soviets developed a similar multi-step approach to NASA, involving a module used to orbit the moon and one for landing. Their version was decidedly less complex and lighter to account for inferior rockets. These photos show the LK “Lunar Craft” lander, which has a similar pod-over-landing gear structure but numerous key differences.
All the activities done by two astronauts is done by one. To make the craft lighter, the LK only fits the one cosmonaut, who was supposed to peer through a tiny window on the side of the craft to land it. After landing the vehicle the pod separates from the landing gear, as with the Apollo Lunar Module, but uses the same engine for landing as it does for take off as another weight savings.
The L2 Lunar Orbit Module designed to transport the LK into orbit around the moon was similarly stripped down. There’s no internal connection between the two craft so the cosmonaut had to space walk outside to get into the LK and head towards the surface. When the LK rejoined the L2 for the return trip home, the now likely exhausted would then climb back out into the abyss of space. The LK would then be thrown away.
There were numerous political, scientific and financial reasons why the Soviets didn’t make it to the moon first, including a space agency with split priorities and therefore not single-mindedly dedicated to this goal. Neil Armstrong walked on the moon first on July 20, 1969, besting the Russians, who were still planning to visit the moon in the upcoming years.
They had the equipment, but they didn’t have the rockets.
Getting to the moon requires launching a command module and a lander. Both are heavy objects and require massive amounts of thrust to get into orbit. The Soviet’s planned to use their N-1 rocket, but two failed launches in 1971 and 1972 destroyed dummy landing and control modules, as well as the rockets themselves, and led to the program being shelved for lack of a proper launch vehicle.
The LK was sent into space for numerous test missions. The first two unmanned flights were successful tests of the vehicle through a simulated orbit. The third flight ended when the N-1 rocket crashed. The fourth test in 1971 was a success, but years later the decaying test module started to return to Earth with a trajectory that would put it over the skies of Australia.
NASA explains in a report on the Soviet space program how they had to convince the Australians it wasn’t a nuclear satellite:
To allay fears of a nuclear catastrophe, representatives of the Soviet Foreign Ministry in Australia admitted that Cosmos 434 was an “experiment unit of a lunar cabin,” or lunar lander
Eventually, the program was deemed too expensive and unnecessary in light of the NASA success. The Soviets moved onto building space labs, successfully, and the remaining parts of the lunar program were destroyed or dispersed, including this amazing collection of parts hidden in the back of the Moscow Aviation Institute.

destroyed-and-abandoned:

The Soviet Moon Lander built to beat the Americans to the moon. Found abandoned in a Lab in Moscow…

ethan_kahn:

album

Soviet scientists were well ahead of their American counterparts in moon exploration before President John F. Kennedy pronounced the U.S. would put a man there first. The Soviets had already landed the probe Luna 2 on the surface of the moon in 1959 and had an orbiting satellite in 1966.

The Soviets developed a similar multi-step approach to NASA, involving a module used to orbit the moon and one for landing. Their version was decidedly less complex and lighter to account for inferior rockets. These photos show the LK “Lunar Craft” lander, which has a similar pod-over-landing gear structure but numerous key differences.

All the activities done by two astronauts is done by one. To make the craft lighter, the LK only fits the one cosmonaut, who was supposed to peer through a tiny window on the side of the craft to land it. After landing the vehicle the pod separates from the landing gear, as with the Apollo Lunar Module, but uses the same engine for landing as it does for take off as another weight savings.

The L2 Lunar Orbit Module designed to transport the LK into orbit around the moon was similarly stripped down. There’s no internal connection between the two craft so the cosmonaut had to space walk outside to get into the LK and head towards the surface. When the LK rejoined the L2 for the return trip home, the now likely exhausted would then climb back out into the abyss of space. The LK would then be thrown away.

There were numerous political, scientific and financial reasons why the Soviets didn’t make it to the moon first, including a space agency with split priorities and therefore not single-mindedly dedicated to this goal. Neil Armstrong walked on the moon first on July 20, 1969, besting the Russians, who were still planning to visit the moon in the upcoming years.

They had the equipment, but they didn’t have the rockets.

Getting to the moon requires launching a command module and a lander. Both are heavy objects and require massive amounts of thrust to get into orbit. The Soviet’s planned to use their N-1 rocket, but two failed launches in 1971 and 1972 destroyed dummy landing and control modules, as well as the rockets themselves, and led to the program being shelved for lack of a proper launch vehicle.

The LK was sent into space for numerous test missions. The first two unmanned flights were successful tests of the vehicle through a simulated orbit. The third flight ended when the N-1 rocket crashed. The fourth test in 1971 was a success, but years later the decaying test module started to return to Earth with a trajectory that would put it over the skies of Australia.

NASA explains in a report on the Soviet space program how they had to convince the Australians it wasn’t a nuclear satellite:

To allay fears of a nuclear catastrophe, representatives of the Soviet Foreign Ministry in Australia admitted that Cosmos 434 was an “experiment unit of a lunar cabin,” or lunar lander

Eventually, the program was deemed too expensive and unnecessary in light of the NASA success. The Soviets moved onto building space labs, successfully, and the remaining parts of the lunar program were destroyed or dispersed, including this amazing collection of parts hidden in the back of the Moscow Aviation Institute.

Tagged: spacehistory

Source: destroyed-and-abandoned

28th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Save The Man with 116 notes

javosironworks:

Edison and Ford’s Shop.jpg on Flickr.

javosironworks:

Edison and Ford’s Shop.jpg on Flickr.

Tagged: decaydesignsciencehistory

Source: javosironworks

25th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Archie McPhee's Endless Geyser of AWESOME! with 331 notes

archiemcphee:


On March 25, 1983 Michael Jackson moonwalked on TV for the very first time. It subsequently became Michael’s signature move and is now one of the best-known dance techniques in the world.
The awesome moment occurred while Michael was performing “Billie Jean” during a television special called Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever, which commemorated Motown Records’ twenty-fifth year of existence. This program not only broadcast the debut of the moonwalk, it also reunited Michael with the rest of the The Jackson 5.
[gif via GlobalGrind]

archiemcphee:

On March 25, 1983 Michael Jackson moonwalked on TV for the very first time. It subsequently became Michael’s signature move and is now one of the best-known dance techniques in the world.

The awesome moment occurred while Michael was performing “Billie Jean” during a television special called Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever, which commemorated Motown Records’ twenty-fifth year of existence. This program not only broadcast the debut of the moonwalk, it also reunited Michael with the rest of the The Jackson 5.

[gif via GlobalGrind]

Tagged: historyanimatedmusic